Graffiti art dates back to Egyptian, Greek and Roman empires in forms of various mediums. The word “graftio,” stems from the Italian word “graffiato,” meaning to scratch a design into a surface. It is closely related to the word “sgraffito,” which means to scratch the surface to reveal an image beneath it. This isn't always the case with present-day graffiti, but on the contrary, if you were to peel off stickers, poster or paint, there will be many layers of images from previous artists. I utilized this technique throughout my body of work. 

 

Growing up in the street art culture of New York in the '80s and '90s is what inspires me to keep that style alive. I approach each piece to vandalize as if I were to spot an empty wall or alleyway to personally make my mark on. 

As street art becomes less and less prominent in urban cities due to gentrification, the art form is transitioning to urban art (i.e. murals). Graffiti and Street Art had an impact on me as a child as well as the community, that in a way, it became a lifestyle. It is up to us to keep this type of form from decaying. 

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Artist Statement

BIO

New York native, Sinclair The Vandal, is a self-taught artist, whose technique, style, and materials translate his experience in the graffiti culture from the ’80s and ’90s of New York City onto canvas. Although not academically trained, he has always utilized painting as an outlet. Given the intuitive nature and control of choice media combined with experimentation, his work achieves the complexity that blurs the lines between “painting” and urban “street art.”

Sinclair the Vandal is an award-winning artist that has been featured in prominent galleries alongside the east coast. His works have been established in Scope NYC,  Moniker NYC, Art Basel Miami Collateral shows including Art Palm Beach. While achieving advance notoriety, Sinclair the Vandal gives back to the community by participating in charity events in the U.S. 

 

As he continues to refine his style, his creative energy and expression continue to be a vital part of his personality, bridging the viewer and his paintings.